Tag Archives: science

Rethinking Berkeley, Naturally!

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My posts to Berkeley, Naturally! have slowed down to the point where I realize I need to re-think the goals of this blog. Originally, I had hoped to make Berkeley, Naturally! a kind of science/nature blog, similar to my other blog Goodheart’s Extreme Science.

But with three blogs to write for and look after, it’s become apparent to me that I can’t be as ambitious with Berkeley, Naturally! as I had hoped. It will need to be more of a nature/photo blog and less of a science oriented blog, although it will always have a science and nature lover’s perspective.

When I have time, though, I’ll probably still want to do in-depth posts with like these:

They Are the Ladybugs of the Canyon

Berkeley Hills Landslide

Source Area – Where the Slope Gave Way

Escape from New England—A Weather Nut’s Confession

I get up in to the Berkeley Hills three or four times a week, and always take my camera, so I will have lots of images to share, and observations. Stop by and have a look!

The Berkeley Hills are calling!

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Kudos to University of California Scientists at the National Ignition Facility

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Anyone who lives in Berkeley knows how central the University of California is to our beloved city. They also probably know what an important place the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has in the University of California academic “ecosystem.”

I love to hike up Centennial Drive to the wonderful Lawrence Hall of Science above Berkeley:

Every time I visit, I realize the incredible historical role the University of California, Berkeley, has played in the history of science:

Last week, the scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA, hit another one out of the park, so to speak, and everyone can be proud of UCB and the Livermore Lab folks.

On Thursday, Januray 28th, 2010, the scientists at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore announced that they had used a super-laser to create a fusion reaction that produced more energy than it used. This was a scientific breakthrough that helps bring us even closer to the “holy grail” of clean, sustainable fusion energy.

If you want to learn all about this breakthrough, and the science behind it—in language non-scientists or high school students can understand—stop by my sister blog, Goodheart’s Extreme Science and check out:

How Scientists brought the power of the Sun to Earth

This post has some great images from the LLN Lab and scientific explanations that just about anyone can understand. I think you’ll find it interesting and fun.

So, enjoy! And congratulations to the amazing men and women of NIF and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory! Once again, the University of California, Berkeley, demonstrates its unique place in academia and the scientific world.